Skip to main content

Distance Learning

Distance Learning

New   

Parents:  Check out the Educational Websites.  There are links to more than 20 pages of fun, engaging websites that offer opportunities for reading enrichment.  Websites are added weekly.  Additionally there will be family reading activities provided each week that do not require the internet.  Please email me if you have any questions. 

Students:  You will find links for some of your favorite programs in the Educational Websites tab.  Assignments are available, but not required.  I will be updating with new assignments each Monday.  Work at your own pace and have fun! 

Family Connections Assignment

May 4-8

 

First Grade

Book Scavenger Hunt

Materials:  A variety of children’s books

Directions:  Help your child find the following items::

  1.  Find an animal in a book

  2. Find a boy’s name in a book

  3. Find a girl’s name in a book

  4. Find a book that makes you laugh

  5. Find a character eating in a book

  6. Find a pet in a book

  7. Find a superhero in a book

  8. Find something with wheels in a book

  9. Find a superhero in a book

  10. Find a word that starts with the same letter as your first name.

Second Grade

The Match Game

 Children sometimes need extra practice with unfamiliar words.  

Materials:   Ten words that are unfamiliar to your child.  Ten pieces of paper or cards with one word written on each piece.  Another set of 20 cards with the same words written on them.

Directions:  Mix the words together.  Give your child five cards, and give yourself five cards.  Put the rest of the card in a pile, face down on the table.  Both of you pick up your cards to see if you have two words that are the same among all your cards.  If so, say the word and put them down as a pair.  Then pick up two more cards from the ile.  If neither of you has a pair, draw a card from the pile.  Take turns until all the cards have been drawn or one player has gotten rid of all of his or her cards.   The player with the most matching airs is the winner.

Third Grade

In Laughing Order:  The Comic Strips

When children read about events, they must keep the major actions in order.  Children can develop a sense for order while reading comic strips.

Materials:  Your child’s favorite comic strip

Directions:  Find a comic strip that you and your child enjoy.  Before reading the strip, cut it out and separate the frames.  Mix them up and ask your child to put the frames in the correct order.  Once they are in order, have your child read the comic strip and tell you what the strip means or is saying.

Fourth Grade

Word Families

Words come in all shapes and sizes, but many owrds that children read and hear come in word families.

Materials:  Pencil and paper

Directions:  Give your child a word (such as add) that is found in many other words (such as addition and adding).  Ask your child to think of other words that are “roots” for related words , such as comete, and ask the child to write out the related word (competition, competitor, competitive).

Ask your child to keep a record for the “word families”  See how many words make from root words your child can find in a week.

April 27-May1

First Grade

Story Tag

It is important for children to read words in sentences and stories, so they realize that reading is about understanding.

Materials:  An easy-to-read story with many words your child can already sound out or read.

Directions:  Tell your child, “In this story, I’ll read some of the words and you”ll read some words. When it’s your turn to read,, I will tap your shoulder and tag you.”  Start reading.  As you come to parts of the story that your child can read comfortably, tap the child’s shoulder.  Keep taking turns reading the story.  You can go back and reread parts of the same stories for extra practice.

Second Grade

Now You Hear It, Now You Don’t

Hearing and saying the parts of words help prepare children to learn to read.

Materials:  A list of words with two parts, like baseball, doghouse,  raincoat, sunshine, and motorcycle.

Directions:  Sit beside your child.  Tell the child that you will say a word and then you sill leave off part of the word.  Ask your child to tell you what part you left off.  For example, tell the child, “Let’s say sunshine without sun, what part is left?  That’s right, shine.”  Repeat this activity with other words until you have completed the list.  As your child learns this game, try leaving off the last part of words.  (manhole without hole is man; doghouse without house is dog). 

Third Grade

The Match Game

 Children sometimes need extra practice with unfamiliar words.  

Materials:   Ten words that are unfamiliar to your child.  Ten pieces of paper or cards with one word written on each piece.  Another set of 20 cards with the same words written on them.

Directions:  Mix the words together.  Give your child five cards, and give yourself five cards.  Put the rest of the card in a pile, face down on the table.  Both of you pick up your cards to see if you have two words that are the same among all your cards.  If so, say the word and put them down as a pair.  Then pick up two more cards from the ile.  If neither of you has a pair, draw a card from the pile.  Take turns until all the cards have been drawn or one player has gotten rid of all of his or her cards.   The player with the most matching airs is the winner.

Fourth Grade

My Turn, Your Turn--Our Story

  Writing stories is fun, but it really comes alive when yur child creates and writes a stor with you.

  Materials:  Paper, pencil, and a story title

Directions:  Create or choose an exciting title for a story you would like to write with your child.  Write the title on a sheet of paper and invite your child to write the first sentence.  You write the second line.  Take turns writing sentences until the story is complete.  When the story is finished, invite the family to a story-reading session or read it to the family over dinner.

 

April 20-24

First Grade

Your Story Ending

An important part of reading and listening to stories is learning that they have endings.  Sometimes the end of a story is a surprise, and sometimes it is not. Once children become familiar with stories, they can help create their own ending to a story.

Materials:  A story your child does not already know.  

Directions:  Read the story to your child.  When you are close to the end of the story, stop reading.  Ask your child how he or she would complete the story. Then finish reading the story.  Talk about how the story’s ending and your child’s ending for it are different or the same.

Second Grade

Story Tag

It is important for children to read words in sentences and stories, so they realize that reading is about understanding.

Materials:  An easy-to-read story with many words your child can already sound out or read.

Directions:  Tell your child, “In this story, I’ll read some of the words and you”ll read some words. When it’s your turn to read,, I will tap your shoulder and tag you.”  Start reading. As you come to parts of the story that your child can read comfortably, tap the child’s shoulder. Keep taking turns reading the story. You can go back and reread parts of the same stories for extra practice.

Third Grade

Lessons Learned

An important part of reading is guessing what the lesson or theme of a story is.

Materials:  A fable-either from a book or as told by a family member

Directions:  Choose a short fable to read or tell to your child.  Stop before you get to the moral at the end of the story.  Ask your child to state what lesson the story has to tell. Then finish reading or telling the fable.  Then tell the moral. At the end of this game, talk to your child about the story. Were there any surprises in the story?  What did they learn?

 

Fourth Grade

In Laughing Order:  The Comic Strips

When children read about events, they must keep the major actions in order.  Children can develop a sense for order while reading comic strips.

Materials:  Your child’s favorite comic strip

Directions:  Find a comic strip that you and your child enjoy.  Before reading the strip, cut it out and separate the frames.  Mix them up and ask your child to put the frames in the correct order.  Once they are in order, have your child read the comic strip and tell you what the strip means or is saying.

 

April  13-17

 

First Grade

Letter Swap

Good readers learn to recognize and make new words by swapping letters within words.  In this activity, children build new words by swapping letter-sounds.

Materials:  Two words written in large print.  The first word is a whole word (such as sat).  The second word has a blank for the first letter (__at).  A set of letters (g,s,t,m,p,r,h,f,k.l) with each letter written on a seperate piece of paper.

Directions:  Sit beside your child.  Put the large-print words in front of your child.

     Sat

     _at

Say, “We’re going to see how many words we can make like sat.  I’ll pick a letter from the pile. My sound is r. I can change sat to rat.  Put the r in the blank space in front of at”

Have your child do this again picking different letters and making new words.  Change to a new word such as map, fill, cake, bell, nine, sail, or cow.  

Do this activity with new words.

 

Second  Grade

Story Sprint

After children can read words correctly, they can begin to work on speed.

Materials:  A story with words your child can sound out or read as whole words.

                 A watch or timer.

Directions:  (1) Tell your child, “In this game, you’re going to read a story as if you’re in a race.  Each time you read the story, try to read it faster with fewer mistakes.”

(2)  Set the timer for one minute.  Remind your child to read as quickly and correctly as possible.  Say, “Start.” Begin timing. At the end of the minute, say “Stop.” and count the number of words read correctly.

(3)  Help your child with words he or she did not know.  Have your child read the same story again for one minute.  Count the number of words read correctly. Compare the number of words to the number read in the first reading.  Have your child read the story a third time.  

(4)   Say, “When you practice reading the same story again and again, you can read faster and faster.  Good job.”

Third Grade

Word Wizard 

Learning about words is important to learning inside and outside school.  The more words a child knows, the more the child will learn. 

Materials:  A newspaper, magazine, or book.  A notebook. 

Directions:

-Have your child find a word in a newspaper. Magazine, or book that he or she does not know and has not seen before.  For example, your child may not know the word foretell ( meaning “to predict or tell beforehand” as in “The woman in red could foretell the future”)

-Your child might also find a word that is familiar but used in a new way.  For example, the word boat means a small vessel used for getting around by water.d  However, when boat is used in the sentence “The people were all in the same boat,” it means “faced with the same problems.”

-Ask your child to listen for a new word in everyday talk, on television, or look for a new word in print.  Have your child find a new word or an old word used in a new way each day. Ask your child to keep track of the words in a special notebook and you can discuss the meanings

 

Fourth Grade

Lessons Learned

An important part of reading is guessing what the lesson or theme of a story is.

Materials:  A fable-either from a book or as told by a family member

Directions:  Choose a short fable to read or tell to your child.  Stop before you get to the moral at the end of the story.  Ask your child to state what lesson the story has to tell. Then finish reading or telling the fable.  Then tell the moral. At the end of this game, talk to your child about the story. Were there any surprises in the story?  What did they learn?

 


April 6-10

First Grade

Rhyme Time

Children love words that rhyme.  Rhyming words are important to reading because       they call children’s attention to the sounds inside words.

Materials:    

 Some words that rhyme.

Directions:    

*Think of words that rhyme.  Say two words that rhyme, such as cat and hat.  Then say, “Listen to these two words that rhyme, cat (pause) hat.”  Then say, “Now I’m going to say other words that rhyme with cat and hat.  Here’s another one, rat. Now you tell me another word that rhymes with cat, hat, and rat (such as bat).”

*Repeat this game with other words that rhyme, such as:

pot, tot, lot, hot

pin, tin fin, in

tag rag, sag, bag

cake, bake, rake

cow, now, how, 

 

 

Second Grade

Sound Clapping

Listening to sounds in words is important.  Knowing where sounds of words begin and end is also important to reading.

Materials:

A list of two-or three-syllable words.

 

Directions:

  1.  Tell your child that you will say a word and clap for the main sound parts in the word.  For example, “The first word is Mama.  I’ll clap and say the word again.  Ma-ma. (Say Ma-ma and clap as you say each part of the word for two claps.)” “ Now you clap the rhythm when I say Mama”  Take your child’s name and clap it out.

  2. Repeat this activity with other multi-syllable words.

Third Grade

The One-Minute Dash

Reading quickly and with ease is very important to successful reading, but, like running, it requires a lot of coaching and practice.  To become a fluent reader, your child must practice reading quickly. Remember, however, that too much practice at one time is not helpful.

Materials:

A watch or clock with a second hand and a book. Most cell phones have a timer.   Your child must be able to read the book with little or no help.

Directions:

Tell your child, “Let’s play a game called the one-minute-dash.  I want to see how many words you can read in one minute.”  

Then- “When I say Go, I want you to begin reading.  After one minute I’ll tell you to stop”  When your child is ready to start, say “Get ready...Set...GO!”  Check your watch.  After a minute, ask your child to stop reading.

Last-Count the total number of words your child read.  If you like, you can keep a chart to show their progress over time.

 

Fourth Grade

Word Wizard

Learning about words is important to learning inside and outside school.  The more words a child knows, the more the child will learn.

Materials:  A newspaper, magazine, or book.  A notebook.

Directions:

-Have your child find a word in a newspaper. Magazine, or book that he or she does not know and has not seen before.  For example, your child may not know the word foretell  ( meaning “to predict or tell beforehand” as in “The woman in red could foretell the future”)

-Your child might also find a word that is familiar but used in a new way.  For example, the word boat means a small vessel used for getting around by water.d  However, when boat is used in the sentence “The people were all in the same boat,” it means “faced with the same problems.”

-Ask your child to listen for a new word in everyday talk, on television, or look for a new word in print.  Have your child find a new word or an old word used in a new way each day. Ask your child to keep track of the words in a special notebook and you can discuss the meanings.

 

 

Tip:  Use the five finger rule when helping your child choose a book.  Open the book to any age and ask your child to read.  Put up a finger every time your child does not know a word.  If you have put up more than five fingers before the end of the page, this book is too hard for your child.                  

           

 

 

 

 

 

Sheila Mercer's Class

Upcoming Events

Contact Sheila Mercer